Windy, with a side of snow

Last week, weather happened in the UK and we ground to a halt. As a country, we are ill equipped to deal with snow at the best of times (for the most part, it just does not happen enough) but combine this with two stormfronts, well, then you got chaos.

We mainly stayed inside apart from sledging when the wind finally settled on Saturday. And now, today as I look out of the window, the snow is almost gone. Amazing how 8 Celcius can feel almost tropical.

There is a lesson there. And I am not saying that the weather happened for me to acknowledge something to myself, yet the weather totally helped.

For one: I am super creative making the contents of my fridge/freezer last and come up with delicious meals out of sheer nothingness. A tin of tomatoes, some random lentils and bits and bobs of veg made one of the best soups ever. I baked bread. I made oat cookies. Hearty dishes for the freezing temperatures. It pleased me and I am not always good at acknowledging this talent of mine, because a talent it is.

Two: When it comes down to the knuckle, most things can wait. You can just let it all go, because stuff mostly can wait.

Three: As a family we are good at being cooped up with each other. That’s good to know too.

Now the snow is going and it’s back to normality. Soon we shall be in Scotland quite frankly, I cannot wait. Right now as I look out of the window, I see houses and cars. When we are in Scotland, I will see the loch, the hills and maybe a boat.

Flavia De Luce #9: The Grave’s a Fine and Private Place

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I remember reading my first Flavia De Luce mystery 4 years ago and being instantly hooked. Everything from the disheveled manor house, the horrid sisters, the housekeeper/cook that cannot really cook nor keep house, the general factotum Dogger… to last but not least Flavia herself, 11 year old chemist, lonely and very precocious.

Now, imagine my surprise when I recommended this series to a friend and she did not like it because of Flavia. I nearly took offense, because at times, we do take insults to favourite fictional characters rather personal. Yet, thinking about it, I can see that Flavia may split the lovers and haters quite distinctly.

I adore her. I laugh out loud reading it, I am often feeling very sad for her. I know there is a huge part of me that can identify my own 11 year old with Flavia.

The series also captures a certain post-war mood in 1950ies Britain, the manors of the former rich now broke were falling apart, rationing was still going, it just did not really feel like a war had being won.

I was delighted when I got send a digital ARC for book 9 in the series. Ecstatic. Delirious. And I immediately sat down and read it. The De Luce girls are on a little holiday, punting along a river, when Flavia accidentally (is there any other way) dead body floating in the river. More cannot be said about the plot as this is an ongoing series.

Naturally, I highly recommend this. But start at the beginning. If you hate precocious children, this may not be for you. Otherwise, find a comfy chair, make yourself a cuppa and fetch a plate of biscuits and enjoy.

I certainly did.


Hardcover, 368 pages
Published February 8th 2018 by Orion (first published January 30th 2018)
Thanks to Netgalley and Orion for the advance copy.