Rosemary, Oh, Rosemary

The incomparable Juliette de Bairacli Levy said in the documentary about her life (Juliette of the Herbs, if you have never watched please do) that in every garden she has created throughout her life, she always planted rosemary and southernwood in each of those gardens. She then goes on to joke about how people say that she heals everything with rosemary.

Rosemary is a great herb and there is no doubt about it, whether you put it in the pan with roast potatoes, chop it and put it on your focaccia with some olive oil before you bake it in the oven or if you add it to stews and soups: the rich flavour and the smell of the cooking in the kitchen will give you a sense of well-being.  Try it, if you never used it before.

Whenever I go in my little garden, I always brush along the rosemary plant and smell my fingers. It makes me happy.

In the herbal healing world, or the herbalist world (and I am no expert folks, I have just been a dabbler for years and now I am a serious beginner on a journey), rosemary is attributed to benefit humans in many ways:

  • boosts memory
  • detoxifies the body
  • improves mood
  • increases immunity
  • protects from bacterial infections
  • prevents premature aging
  • reduces inflammation
  • relieves pain
  • stimulates circulation
  • treats skin conditions

Rosemary is pretty much unkillable as a plant in a garden, mine lives in a huge pot. It likes being cut and will be healthier if you do take quite a bit from it.

An easy way to use rosemary and store it ready in the kitchen is to make an infused oil. Infused oils can form the basis for many applications, topical but also for food use. Beware though: not all herbs can be ingested. However, rosemary can.

Infused oils basics:

You need:

  • a double boiler (best way
  • oil (coconut oil, olive oil etc. etc. depending on what you want to use it for)

How I make it:

I put some water in the bottom of the double boiler, put the top bit on and this I add a decent handful of rosemary (stems and all) with the oil.

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Rosemary oil simmering away in the double boiler

I live it on a very, very low heat (you don’t want the oil to boil, nor do you want it to simmer or bubble, it just has to be hot) for about 30 minutes.

Then drain it through a sieve, make sure you squeeze every last bit out. Then I use the once infused oil and repeat the process with another batch of rosemary. Again 30 minutes. Again drain and then store in a suitable container (glass is best, plastic will take on the smell of anything you put in it).

I made some last weekend with coconut oil with a plan to make body butter and a balm out of it. My skin is super dry and now with winter coming, I need a barrier on it when I go for walks and hikes as the wind otherwise makes my skin split open. The balm will be great to keep my feet healthy during winter, they don’t like to be in socks and shoes and slippers all the time, so again the rosemary will help.

The body butter is a cream by the inimitable Rosemary Gladstar. image1 (9)

Waters

2/3 c cup distilled water (or rose water) (please don’t buy the distilled water used for car batteries, treat yourself, it goes on your skin)
1/3 cup aloe vera gel
1 or 2 drops essential oil of choice
Vitamins A and E as desired

Oils

3/4 cup apricot, almond, or grapeseed oil
1/3 cup coconut oil or cocoa butter (this is were I used my rosemary oil!)
1/4 teaspoon lanolin (you can leave this out, but it makes the cream more runny, I know some vegans use cocoa butter)
1/2 to 1 ounce grated beeswax (vegan alternative is candelilla wax)

1. Combine the waters in a glass measuring cup. Set aside.

2. In a double boiler over low heat, combine the oils. Heat them just enough to melt.

3. Pour the oils into a blender (I use a stick blender, mine is metal so very easy to clean) and let them cool to room temperature. The mixture should become thick, creamy, semisolid, and cream colored. This cooling process can be hastened in the refrigerator, but keep an eye on it so it doesn’t become too hard.

4. When the mixture has cooled, turn on the blender at its highest speed. In a slow, thin
drizzle, pour the water mixture into the center  vortex of the whirling oil mixture.

5. When most of the water mixture has been added to the oils, listen to the blender and watch the cream. When the blender coughs and chokes and the cream looks thick and white, like buttercream frosting, turn off the blender. You can slowly add more water, beating it in by hand with a spoon, but don’t overbeat! The cream will thicken as it sets.

6. Pour into cream or lotion jars. Store in a cool location.

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As for the balm: 

Put 8 parts of the rosemary oil and 1 part of wax into a double boiler (In my case that was 80g of oil and 8g of wax and let it melt. Once melted you can remove it from the heat and add an essential oil (I added some geranium because I love the scent, 4 drops was enough for the mixture. Pour into a jar, leave to set (don’t put the lid on while it cools down, the steam has to evaporate) and then put a lid on and label your jar.

ALWAYS LABEL YOUR JARS! No excuses.